Tag Archives: Nature

Photo Challenge: Rock

Rock.  And not rock.  Because, of course, seeing a fake rock is ever so much better than seeing utility connections.

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Rock and Not Rock.  Photo: TLClark, 3/26/19.

Rock.  And water.  And a rock retaining wall of sorts.  The little neighborhood stream – which isn’t always so little – goes under the street, through the Woodland Reserve pond and into Fourmile Creek.  The fire hydrant in the top left corner tickles my fancy for some inexplicable reason.  (The pile of snow near the hydrant might be hard as rock but it will melt away one of these days.)

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Neighborhood Stream.  Photo: TLClark, 3/26/19.

Rock.  On a beach, nearly six months ago, some 2000 miles from home.  Ever so much more interesting than what I saw last Tuesday.

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Rocks. Golden Gardens Park (on Puget Sound), Seattle, Washington.  Photo: TLClark, 10/7/18.

Another great Tuesday Photo Challenge from Dutch goes the Photo!

A. A. Milne: Daffodowndilly

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Daffodils, Reiman Gardens, 5/4/18.  Photo: TLClark.

Daffodowndilly

She wore her yellow sun-bonnet,

She wore her greenest gown;

She turned to the south wind

And curtsied up and down.

She turned to the sunlight

And shook her yellow head,

And whispered to her neighbour:

“Winter is dead.”

A.A.Milne, in When We Were Very Young, Copyright, 1924 by E. P. Dutton, Copyright Renewal, 1952, by A. A. Milne

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Daffodils, Reiman Gardens, 5/4/18.  Photo: TLClark.

Daffodil season is a month or more away here in central Iowa.  But I read the A. A. Milne poem the other day and couldn’t resist sharing.  The pictures are from an outing last spring to Reiman Gardens, Iowa State University, Ames (click here to discover Reiman Gardens).  The bright yellow makes me smile despite the overcast, rainy, gray day out my window this morning.

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Double Daffodils, Reiman Gardens, 5/4/18.  Photo: TLClark.

Have a beautiful day!

Teressa

Photo Challenge: Wonder

Spring is on the way!  I marvel, even wonder, at buds swelling on the end of tree branches.

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Photo: TLClark, 3/19/19.

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Photo: TLClark, 3/19/19.

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Photo: TLClark, 3/19/19.

With eyes open and a camera in hand, I found a few other things of wonder in my neighborhood this morning.

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Re-freeze from yesterday’s snow melt. Photo: TLClark, 3/19/19.

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Leaf in snow bank. Photo: TLClark, 3/19/19.

Thanks, Frank, for the photo challenge!

Photo Challenge: Sunrise

When I read Frank’s photo challenge Tuesday I just laughed.  It was a dark and stormy morning with more rain than sunshine.  Wednesday rolled in with dense fog.  A sunrise on Thursday didn’t look promising – more dark clouds and plenty of wind – but I looked out after breakfast and decided to walk down the street in search of the sun.

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Woodland Reserve Pond.  Photo: TLClark, 3/14/19.

After weeks and weeks of snow and cold, it felt good to be walking outside!  It was still chilly but the sidewalks were mostly clear.  I imagine the bike path (on the other side of the pond) still has a few icy sections.  Between melting snow and heavy rain Fourmile Creek is FULL and flooding low-lying areas.

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Fourmile Creek Flooding Briarwood Golf Club, Ankeny, Iowa.  Photo: TLClark, 3/14/19.

While I didn’t get a spectacular sunrise picture, just being outside was good for my spirit.  Being outside near sunrise reminded me of this Bible verse:

The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases, [God’s] mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.  – Lamentations 3:22-23 NRSV

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No Parking Anytime.  Photo: TLClark, 3/14/19.

Satisfy us in the morning with your steadfast love, so that we may rejoice and be glad all our days.  – Psalm 90:14 NRSV

May you know steadfast love and mercy every morning – whatever the weather!

Teressa

Take a look at fresh fruit

I suggest you ignore this post.  Instead, find a piece of fresh fruit, pick it up, and take a few minutes to consider its surface texture.  While you’re at it, notice how it was attached to the tree or bush or vine or whatever plant on which it grew.

What?  You’re still reading?  Or did you come back?

The other day I noticed a banana on the table.  Its surface is smoother than an orange.  And not quite as smooth as an apple.

The results of my attempts to photograph the banana were dismal.  The orange and the apple pictures were better.  Eating breakfast this morning I decided to try getting decent photos of blueberries and strawberries.

So here you are: pictures of fruit.

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Fuji Apple.  Photo: TLClark, Feb 2019.

I’m thinking a whole series of photos of apples would be fun to do.  Different kinds with their different colors.  Use a knife to cut one way to see the star-shaped center with seeds.  Cut the other way – the usual way – for apple slices to eat with peanut butter.  Maybe an apple with a single bite or perhaps many bites.  Maybe just an apple core.

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Navel Orange.  Photo: TLClark, Feb 2019.

I really should have taken a photo of the navel end of the orange!  But I liked seeing the stem; notice how different is is from the apple stem.

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Blueberries.  Photo: TLClark, Feb 2019.

I opted not to highlight the ends of the blueberries once attached to a plant because I’m intrigued by the little star on the other end!

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Strawberries.  Photo:  TLClark, Feb 2019.

The underside of the leaves of the strawberries are a much brighter green than the top side.  I wonder if that’s always true or just true of this particular crop.

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Fruit in Bowl.  TLClark, 2019.

If there were other kinds of fresh fruit in the house – other than an over-ripe banana and some pineapple already cut up – I’d have more pictures.  Guess I need to start next Friday’s grocery list!

 

Another Snowy Sunday

It snowed nine or ten inches between 9 p.m. Saturday and mid-day Sunday.

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Since snow-covered, slippery roads have veto power over (nearly) every voluntary activity, my husband and I missed gathering with other Christians to worship God for the second week in a row.  We’re the type that rarely miss church.  Missing two Sundays in a row is highly uncharacteristic, nearly unthinkable!  God doesn’t mind; but it makes my week feel odd.

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Our driveway Sunday morning after a bit of shoveling on my part an hour or so earlier; before the professionals arrived.

A week ago we held our own little worship service.  We sang a few songs from Taizé, read John’s favorite scripture (Matthew 6:25-31), prayed, and sang some more.

This Sunday we listened to Iowa Public Radio and worked on a puzzle while waiting for our out-of-town weekend guests.  It had just begun snowing when they headed to the hotel late Saturday; we were hoping they’d safely return to our home Sunday.  (They did.)

Whether heading to church or staying home, It’s Been a Minute with Sam Sanders has become one of my must-listen-to Sunday programs.  Sam and his guests help me hear the week’s news from a perspective outside my every day experience.  It has the feel of chatting with friends and leaves me feeling both encouraged and challenged (much like a good sermon).  I can’t tell you what I heard yesterday but I’m sure it fed my spirit (also like a good sermon).

Be safe, friends, wherever you are whether or not there’s snow on the ground.  And may you hear something today that feeds your spirit.

Teressa

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Crawl

My imagination must have been napping when I read Frank’s photo challenge earlier this week.  Nothing came to mind for the prompt “crawl.”  He had a photo of a snake. Since I’m not a fan of snakes, I knew I wouldn’t go that direction!

An idea crept up on me earlier today.  Crawling through photo file folders, I found a few not-so-creepy-crawlies on flowers.  Bugs don’t creep me out like snakes do.  And most of the bugs that have appeared in my pictures fly as well as crawl.

Here are three photos of Japanese beetles on flowers and one image of damage done.  All were taken in early July 2011 when the beetles invaded our flower beds, voraciously eating their way through foliage.

IMG_1426One Japanese beetle crawling on a single zinnia doesn’t look too destructive.

IMG_1474One cosmos with seven – or more – Japanese beetles doing their thing.

IMG_1488Japanese beetles are certainly crawling all over the marigolds, but are they feasting?

Zinnia foliageShredded leaves tell the tale of the beetles’ visit.