Category Archives: Photo Challenge

Photo Challenge: All Lined Up

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Iowa Fields in Spring.  Photo: TLClark.  5/30/19.

It just makes me smile to see rows and rows of corn in the field.  Looking one direction, the rows are clear.  Move around the field 90 degrees and the rows disappear.  This photo is proof that at least a few farmers in Iowa have been able to plant this spring – before or between rain storms.

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Branch of Honeysuckle.  Photo: TLClark. 5/30/19.

The honeysuckle blossoms were the brightest things on my walk Thursday morning.  Only when I stopped to take Another LQQK did I realize they grow in a row on a branch.

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Honeysuckle Blooms.  Photo: TLClark.  5/30/19.

Saw a post for an “All Lined Up” photo challenge, I couldn’t resist joining the fun with pictures that had yet to make it into a blog post!

 

Photo Challenge: Tower

With a field of TV and Radio Towers not far from us, we can get (nearly) all the TV we care to watch using an HD Antenna.  This first picture was taken about a mile north of our home.

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Photo: TLClark. 5/30/19.

It was so good to see blue sky and sunshine!  We’ve had A LOT of rain in Iowa.  There is major flooding on two of Iowa’s ‘coasts’ – along the Missouri River to the west and the Mississippi River to the east.  The other night it seemed the whole state was under a flash flood warning.  Farmers are struggling to get crops planted, adding heartburn and headache to the hurt from tariffs.  Some families in southwest Iowa haven’t seen their homes in a couple of months.  If you’re the praying type….

The pictures were taken from the side of the road – no trespassing and no traipsing through mud!  The first photo was looking due north.  These middle two are from the southwest, looking northeast.

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Photo: TLClark. 5/30/19.

The reflecting pond (above) is not a pond at all – just a low spot in the field.

The power line tower in the foreground (below) gives a bit of perspective at how tall* the TV towers are.  The town of Alleman is in the background.  You can see an array of satellite dishes on the ground, the sphere of a water tower, a school and the town’s grain elevators.

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Photo: TLClark. 5/30/19.

The last two pictures were as close as I got to the TV towers.  You don’t see all the guy-wires from a distance!  It’s the same anchor in both photos.  (Note:  those are power lines in the top right of the last picture.)

 

*The tallest tower is 2000 feet.  Click here for information on the WOI tower, here for the specs on the KCCI tower, and here for a 2007 article (with pictures) about the towers.

Photographed and posted in response to the Tuesday Photo Challenge found at Dutch goes the Photo!

A Photo a Week Challenge: Squares and Circles

I’ve been looking for squares and circles every where I go since reading Nancy Merrill’s photo challenge.  These pictures were taken at the supper table today.  Bad manners, I know.  But I was enjoying myself and my table mate didn’t seem to mind much.

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Pink Lemonade.  Photo: TLClark, 5/19/19.

Looking straight down, the rim of the glass of lemonade was circular.  The ice cubes weren’t cubes, but they were square’ish on one side.  Did you notice the straw?  I forgot to say I didn’t need – or want – one.

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Salt & Pepper.  Photo: TLClark, 5/19/19.

The tops of the salt and pepper shakers are round; the bottoms are (nearly) square.  I opted not to tip them on their sides for pictures.

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Salt & Pepper with Reflection.  Photo: TLClark, 5/1919.

Intrigued by the reflections on the table, I asked my dinner partner to pose.  The plate was not round and I didn’t like the result of cropping the photo square – so it doesn’t really fit the challenge.  But it makes me smile!

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Photo Challenge: Wheel

With wheel as the photo challenge today I wandered through memories of growing up in eastern Montana, taking black and white pictures of old farm equipment.  Rather than digging through boxes of old photo albums, I pulled up digital pictures from an August 2008 visit.  I knew I had taken pictures at Neumann’s Ranch and was pleased to find photos of wheels.

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Wheel from an Old Plow, Neumann Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

Dad identified what I had via the screen-sharing option in a Skype call.  It was fun to hear him describe how various pieces of equipment were used and to have him help pick pictures to share.  He thought long and hard about the wheel in the top picture; unfortunately there is no additional context since it’s the only photo of that particular wheel.

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Wheel of an Old Buck Rake, Neumann  Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

The tines of the old buck rake drop down to pick up hay.  A lever is used to trip the rake, leaving hay rolled into a pile.

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Old Buck Rake, Neumann Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

When no longer needed on an old rake, wheels work as functional art!

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Bob’s Handiwork, Neumann Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Three of a Kind

Have you looked, really looked, at leaves on trees in the springtime?
As in walk over to a tree and examine the little bits of green growing on the branches?

New leaves are AMAZING!

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Tiny New Leaves. Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

Tiny and perfectly shaped.
Reaching for sunlight.
Connected to branch to trunk to earth.

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New Leaves Reaching Upward.  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

Growing from branches old and new.
Unfurling as they expand.
Ready to dance in a breeze.

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*******

Thank-you, Nancy Merrill, for this week’s photo challenge:

… take three photos of the same subject, but from different angles or distances or whatever. This will give you the chance to look at your subject in a lot of different ways. This is the only rule, so have fun.

The pictures are from yesterday’s morning walk (to see post click here).  There are more leaf pictures to come!

Photo Challenge: Technology

Last week when Frank’s photo challenge was connections I thought about posting this picture of yesteryear:  an old rotary dial telephone.  It might be old technology but it still worked when I noticed it several years ago!IMG_1045

My mom has talked to her mom on the telephone at least once a week for as long as I can remember.  She used to give strict instructions whenever one of us kids went into the Post Office to get the mail:  leave the phone bill in the mailbox if Dad was in the car.  (We lived in a small town where everyone got their mail at the Post Office.)  Long-distance phone calls added up but she managed the money and always made ends meet!

As a college student I talked to my parents by telephone every Sunday morning.  I’d “one-ring” them from the dorm by calling home and letting it ring just once.  They’d call back immediately.  It was the cheapest way to have a phone conversation.  For years I thought it was Mom who wanted to talk; then one day I was with them when Dad asked Mom to call my sister so HE could talk.DSC01731 (3)The rotary dial was replaced by buttons but the phone was still plugged into a wall socket and still had a twisty, twirly phone cord!  As teens we’d stretch the phone cord as far as we possibly could to get around the corner from the kitchen for a more private conversation!

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My husband and I entered the cordless phone age when we moved into a house with very few phone jacks.  At least two houses later – and in an era where landlines are going away – we still use a set of cordless phones.  Every once in a while the question “where’s the phone?” comes up.

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I resisted cell phones until going away for two weeks of continuing education a dozen years ago.  My husband still uses an old flip phone – although we’ve been talking about getting him an upgrade!  Meanwhile I have a semi-smart cell phone which works just fine for phone calls and text messages; in a pinch I can use it to check my email.

My mom now talks to her mom via telephone every other day or so.  I usually talk to my parents a couple times a week.  When Dad wants to talk he’ll phone (or ask Mom to call) and suggest visiting via Skype.  Being able to see each other while talking means he can show off the latest creation from his wood shop or Mom’s sewing room.

Communications technology.  What will they think of next?

Photo Challenge: Connections

Connections - CROP

CROP Hunger Walk,  Mississippi Waterfront, Muscatine, Iowa.  Photo: TLClark, 10/2/11.

Searching my memories I finally thought of an occasion when I might have taken a picture that shows the connections we share as human beings on planet earth.  Searching my digital files, I found pictures of several CROP Hunger Walks [1].  I chose this particular picture because it shows:

  • people of all ages from a variety of backgrounds making connections to raise funds to stop hunger locally and around the world;
  • the Mississippi River connecting communities from its source (Lake Itasca) to its mouth (Gulf of Mexico);
  • and trees with roots connecting to the earth and branches reaching out reminding us of our connection to all of nature.

[1]  “CROP Hunger Walks help to provide food and water, as well as resources that empower people to meet their own needs. From seeds and tools, to wells and water systems, to technical training and micro-enterprise loans, the key is people working together to identify their own development priorities, their strengths and their needs… .”       – http://www.crophungerwalk.org  (click here to learn more.)