Monthly Archives: May 2019

Photo Challenge: Wheel

With wheel as the photo challenge today I wandered through memories of growing up in eastern Montana, taking black and white pictures of old farm equipment.  Rather than digging through boxes of old photo albums, I pulled up digital pictures from an August 2008 visit.  I knew I had taken pictures at Neumann’s Ranch and was pleased to find photos of wheels.

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Wheel from an Old Plow, Neumann Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

Dad identified what I had via the screen-sharing option in a Skype call.  It was fun to hear him describe how various pieces of equipment were used and to have him help pick pictures to share.  He thought long and hard about the wheel in the top picture; unfortunately there is no additional context since it’s the only photo of that particular wheel.

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Wheel of an Old Buck Rake, Neumann  Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

The tines of the old buck rake drop down to pick up hay.  A lever is used to trip the rake, leaving hay rolled into a pile.

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Old Buck Rake, Neumann Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

When no longer needed on an old rake, wheels work as functional art!

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Bob’s Handiwork, Neumann Ranch, Eastern Montana.  Photo: TLClark, 8/26/2008.

Monday Musing: Alpha and Omega

“I am the Alpha and the Omega,” says the Lord God,
who is and who was and who is to come,
the Almighty.
– Revelation 1:8 New Revised Standard Version

Sometimes, in the space where I’m drifting off to sleep,
texts I’ve heard recently,
words I’ve just read,
and songs I’ve sung in the past
meet up in my mind.
They’re a bit shy, a little nervous,
not sure they should be in the same place at the same time.

That summer was a new beginning, a new end.
When I look back, I remember my slippery
hands of paint and the sound of Papa’s feet
on Munich Street, and I know that small
piece of the summer of 1942 belonged to only
one man.  Who else would do some painting for
the price of half a cigarette?  That was Papa,
that was typical, and I loved him.
– Markus Zusak, in The Book Thief

Alpha and Omega.
First and Last.
Before the beginning and beyond the end.
Always there.  Always here.
Always now.
Past.  Present.  Future.

Yet we measure time in discrete bits, distinct seasons.
That was then.
A new beginning.  A new end.
This is now.
Also a new beginning and a new end.

In our end is our beginning; in our time, infinity;
in our doubt there is believing, in our life, eternity.
In our death, a resurrection; at the last, a victory,
unrevealed until its season, something God alone can see.
– Natalie Sleeth, “In the Bulb There Is a Flower,” verse 3

Linear.  One thing after another.  Never to go back.
Circular.  One thing after another.  Back at the beginning again.
Timeless with God.

Spring Leaves

A few more leaf pictures from Thursday’s morning walk.

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Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

So little!
So colorful!

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Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

Such strange flowers / seeds hanging below the leaves.

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Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

Such shapes!
Such texture!

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Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

Leaves and sky and water.

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Leaves over Woodland Reserve Pond, Ankeny, Iowa.  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

A Photo a Week Challenge: Three of a Kind

Have you looked, really looked, at leaves on trees in the springtime?
As in walk over to a tree and examine the little bits of green growing on the branches?

New leaves are AMAZING!

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Tiny New Leaves. Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

Tiny and perfectly shaped.
Reaching for sunlight.
Connected to branch to trunk to earth.

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New Leaves Reaching Upward.  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

Growing from branches old and new.
Unfurling as they expand.
Ready to dance in a breeze.

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*******

Thank-you, Nancy Merrill, for this week’s photo challenge:

… take three photos of the same subject, but from different angles or distances or whatever. This will give you the chance to look at your subject in a lot of different ways. This is the only rule, so have fun.

The pictures are from yesterday’s morning walk (to see post click here).  There are more leaf pictures to come!

Morning Walk

My initial intent was simply to go for a walk this morning.  But I grabbed our Sony Cyber-shot camera as I headed out the door.  Two miles, 45 minutes, and 118 pictures later I made it back home.  About half the photos were deleted after being downloaded – a great bonus of digital photography.

More than once I wished I’d had my Canon EOS Rebel XTi.  Nevertheless the zoom feature on Sony means I have pictures of geese, ducks and a cardinal!

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Watching You Watching Us.  Photo: TLCLark, 5/2/19.

The ducklings had been following the adults but decided a swim would be easier than hopping over the rocks.  I was surprised to see I’d captured an adult male jumping in.

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Not without Me!  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

The cardinals are very vocal this time of year so they’re often heard even if not so often seen.

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Heard and Seen!  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

All three pictures shown above were cropped from the original.  The next two pictures are unedited.

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Mushrooms.  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

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Smells like Honeysuckle.  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

One last picture, cropped slightly.

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Crab Apple Blossoms.  Photo: TLClark, 5/2/19.

What have you seen while on a walk lately?

Photo Challenge: Technology

Last week when Frank’s photo challenge was connections I thought about posting this picture of yesteryear:  an old rotary dial telephone.  It might be old technology but it still worked when I noticed it several years ago!IMG_1045

My mom has talked to her mom on the telephone at least once a week for as long as I can remember.  She used to give strict instructions whenever one of us kids went into the Post Office to get the mail:  leave the phone bill in the mailbox if Dad was in the car.  (We lived in a small town where everyone got their mail at the Post Office.)  Long-distance phone calls added up but she managed the money and always made ends meet!

As a college student I talked to my parents by telephone every Sunday morning.  I’d “one-ring” them from the dorm by calling home and letting it ring just once.  They’d call back immediately.  It was the cheapest way to have a phone conversation.  For years I thought it was Mom who wanted to talk; then one day I was with them when Dad asked Mom to call my sister so HE could talk.DSC01731 (3)The rotary dial was replaced by buttons but the phone was still plugged into a wall socket and still had a twisty, twirly phone cord!  As teens we’d stretch the phone cord as far as we possibly could to get around the corner from the kitchen for a more private conversation!

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My husband and I entered the cordless phone age when we moved into a house with very few phone jacks.  At least two houses later – and in an era where landlines are going away – we still use a set of cordless phones.  Every once in a while the question “where’s the phone?” comes up.

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I resisted cell phones until going away for two weeks of continuing education a dozen years ago.  My husband still uses an old flip phone – although we’ve been talking about getting him an upgrade!  Meanwhile I have a semi-smart cell phone which works just fine for phone calls and text messages; in a pinch I can use it to check my email.

My mom now talks to her mom via telephone every other day or so.  I usually talk to my parents a couple times a week.  When Dad wants to talk he’ll phone (or ask Mom to call) and suggest visiting via Skype.  Being able to see each other while talking means he can show off the latest creation from his wood shop or Mom’s sewing room.

Communications technology.  What will they think of next?