Monthly Archives: April 2019

Photo Challenge: Connections

Connections - CROP

CROP Hunger Walk,  Mississippi Waterfront, Muscatine, Iowa.  Photo: TLClark, 10/2/11.

Searching my memories I finally thought of an occasion when I might have taken a picture that shows the connections we share as human beings on planet earth.  Searching my digital files, I found pictures of several CROP Hunger Walks [1].  I chose this particular picture because it shows:

  • people of all ages from a variety of backgrounds making connections to raise funds to stop hunger locally and around the world;
  • the Mississippi River connecting communities from its source (Lake Itasca) to its mouth (Gulf of Mexico);
  • and trees with roots connecting to the earth and branches reaching out reminding us of our connection to all of nature.

[1]  “CROP Hunger Walks help to provide food and water, as well as resources that empower people to meet their own needs. From seeds and tools, to wells and water systems, to technical training and micro-enterprise loans, the key is people working together to identify their own development priorities, their strengths and their needs… .”       – http://www.crophungerwalk.org  (click here to learn more.)

Quilt Block: Mini Stars

When the instructions say to cut 96 squares 1 1/4″ x 1 1/4″, the best bet might be to walk away.  But I had already made 50 different quilt blocks for a mystery quilt block sew-along.  So, a deep breath, a little planning for fabric placement, and I began.

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Using 2″ squares of the background fabric (in this case a light color), I started making square-in-a-square units using the flippy corner method.

That’s my thumb to give you an idea of how little these blocks are.

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Pressed, trimmed, and arranged on a design board.

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More flippy corners sewn and ready to be pressed and trimmed.

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The square-in-a-square units are finished.

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The remaining points for each star are a standard flying goose unit.  Sorry, no picture.  (A flying goose quilt block looks like half a square-in-a-square plus a 1/4″ for seam allowance.)

The travel iron was very handy when it came to pressing all those seams.  The back is attractive in it’s own way.

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Here’s the block.  It was supposed to measure 6 1/2″ by 12 1/2″ at this point.  Mine is a little large but I was rather pleased to have actually completed it!

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The block pattern is “Star Power” by Lisa Bongean of Primitive Gatherings for Block Heads 2 (Moda Fabric’s 2018 Block-of-the-Week).

Can you find it in the completed quilt top?

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Next for this quilt: batting, backing, quilting and binding.  But probably not anytime soon!

Easter

Worship - Faith - Cross and Window

Second Sunday of Easter, Faith United Church of Christ, Muscatine, Iowa.  Photo: TLClark, 4/7/13.

Mark 16:1-8

When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they could go and anoint Jesus’ dead body. Very early on the first day of the week, just after sunrise, they came to the tomb. They were saying to each other, “Who’s going to roll the stone away from the entrance for us?”

When they looked up, they saw that the stone had been rolled away. (And it was a very large stone!)  Going into the tomb, they saw a young man in a white robe seated on the right side; and they were startled.

But he said to them, “Don’t be alarmed! You are looking for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified.[aHe has been raised. He isn’t here. Look, here’s the place where they laid him. Go, tell his disciples, especially Peter, that he is going ahead of you into Galilee. You will see him there, just as he told you.”

Overcome with terror and dread, they fled from the tomb. They said nothing to anyone, because they were afraid.[b]

[a] Or the Crucified One         [b] In most critical editions of the Gk New Testament, the Gospel of Mark ends at 16:8.

Mark 16:1-8, Common English Bible (C) 2011

That’s a wrap.

In the most ancient editions of the Gospel of Mark (which was the first gospel written), it all ends here:  an empty tomb, terror and dread.  No sighting of Jesus.  No sign of the rest of the disciples.  No more words.

To end on a note of fear is neither uplifting nor hope-filled.

And yet it’s my favorite ending.  It leaves so much to the imagination.  It recognizes that whatever happened and whatever comes next cannot be fully explained.  It is a matter of faith.

Clearly the woman talked about what they saw and heard at the tomb.  Jesus must have met them and the other disciples – including Peter – in Galilee.  Otherwise there’s no story.  Jesus would have been forgotten like the now unknown traveling preachers, teachers, healers, magicians, and story-tellers of his time.

The tomb is empty.

Jesus is risen!

Now what?

No matter where you are on life’s journey of faith or non-faith, from whatever religious or cultural tradition of your past or your present, may you have peace in your life this day and every day,  Teressa

Lent.40: Joseph of Arimathea

holy week

Mark 15:42-47

Since it was late in the afternoon on Preparation Day, just before the Sabbath, Joseph from Arimathea dared to approach Pilate and ask for Jesus’ body. (Joseph was a prominent council member who also eagerly anticipated the coming of God’s kingdom.) Pilate wondered if Jesus was already dead. He called the centurion and asked him whether Jesus had already died. When he learned from the centurion that Jesus was dead, Pilate gave the dead body to Joseph. He bought a linen cloth, took Jesus down from the cross, wrapped him in the cloth, and laid him in a tomb that had been carved out of rock. He rolled a stone against the entrance to the tomb. Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Joses saw where he was buried.

Mark 15:42-47, Common English Bible (c) 2011

Isn’t the description of Joseph from Arimathea intriguing? A prominent council member.  Eagerly awaiting God’s kingdom.

Best of all: he was daring.  It is not that he was extraordinarily brave.  He dared.   Dared to screw up the courage needed to approach Pilate to ask for the body of Jesus.  Dared to willingly risk his reputation among his colleagues on the council.  Dared to live out his convictions and commitment to the ways of God.  Dared to act.

-Teressa Clark, 2012, 2019

Lenten Reflections 2019:  Following Jesus from the Mount of Olives to the Tomb ~ Day 40

 

Lent.39: Jesus Dies

holy week

Mark 15:33-41

From noon until three in the afternoon the whole earth was dark. At three, Jesus cried out with a loud shout, “Eloi, eloi, lama sabachthani,” which means, “My God, my God, why have you left me?”

After hearing him, some standing there said, “Look! He’s calling Elijah!” Someone ran, filled a sponge with sour wine, and put it on a pole. He offered it to Jesus to drink, saying, “Let’s see if Elijah will come to take him down.” But Jesus let out a loud cry and died.

The curtain of the sanctuary was torn in two from top to bottom. When the centurion, who stood facing Jesus, saw how he died, he said, “This man was certainly God’s Son.”

Some women were watching from a distance, including Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of James (the younger one) and Joses, and Salome. When Jesus was in Galilee, these women had followed and supported him, along with many other women who had come to Jerusalem with him.

Mark 15:33-41, Common English Bible (c) 2011

The women may have watched from a distance, but at least they were there.  They did one of the most important things we can do in the face of death: show up.  Be there to comfort the grieving, to support one another, to hold a hand or to offer a shoulder to cry on.  Being physically present for another is an act of grace, an act of love.

Many of the people who serve Jesus go unnamed and unrecognized.  The quote “do little things with great love” (St. Therese of Lisieux, a.k.a. “The Little Flower”) comes to mind.   Small deeds and random acts of kindness do make a difference – even when no one notices.

-Teressa Clark, 2012

Lenten Reflections 2019:  Following Jesus from the Mount of Olives to the Tomb ~ Day 39